life will find a way.

I enjoy fossils, rocks, minerals, science, working in museums, RMS Titanic, scores, classical music...

...and a lot of Dr. Alan Grant.

  • crownedrose published a photo post 10 hours ago

    Dreadnoughtus Day: Saturday September 20th.

    Everyone’s been asking if we will have Dreadnoughtus on display for the public, and luckily it is coming true this Saturday! If you’re in the Philadelphia area, come visit The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University for a day full of titanosaur epicness. Here is the day’s breakdown:

    Auditorium

    The Discovery of Dreadnoughtus
    11 a.m.

    Join Drexel University paleontologist Ken Lacovara for a tremendous talk on his discovery ofDreadnoughtus.

    Life in the Field
    2:30 p.m.  

    Meet Jason Poole, the Academy’s own dinosaur hall coordinator, artist, and fossil preparator. Poole was part of the team in Argentina that discovered Dreadnoughtus. He leads the team in the Fossil Prep Lab—the experts who prepared fossils of Dreadnoughtus right here at the museum.

    At Science Live 
    Ongoing, all day

    Actual fossil specimens from Dreadnoughtus, a massive plant-eater will be on display at the museum for one day only at Science Live! Talk to team members who were on the dig in Argentina, as well as the experts who helped prepare the fossil in the Academy of Natural Sciences’ Fossil Prep Lab.

    North American Hall

    Learn more about sauropods, titanosaurs, and how paleontologists find fossils at a discovery station in North American Hall. Touch specimens, do experiments, and see how long Dreadnoughtus really was! Hint: way longer than the Academy’s T. rex!

    Dinosaur Hall

    Measuring up to 42 feet in length and weighing in at an estimated 7.5 tons, Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest predators to ever walk the Earth. This impressive animal is one of many dinosaurs and other Mesozoic creatures you’ll encounter in Dinosaur Hall. More than 30 species are represented, about half of which are full skeletal mounts, including Avaceratops, Chasmosaurus, Corythosaurus, Deinonychus, Pachycephalosaurus, Tenontosaurus, and Tylosaurus.

    Fossil Prep Lab

    If you want to see paleontology in action, check out the Academy’s Fossil Prep Lab. You can watch as our staff, volunteers, and other skilled workers prepare fossils for study by scientists from other research institutions.

    It’s going to be an awesome day!

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  • crownedrose published a text post 6 days ago

    My two personal favourite articles about Dreadnoughtus since its announcement are below. We can’t stop talking about it, and we have so many people calling us about this guy! Sorry to say we don’t have the fossils on display, but we sure wish we could! They’re kind of huge. One of the femurs I’ve looked over is taller than me, and just the massive size (scale and weight) of it is crazy. Thank goodness our lab floors are strong!

    I really love the 550 Giant Pandas scale and final image in guff.com’s post. Oh man.

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  • crownedrose reblogged a video post 1 week ago

    jtotheizzoe:

    crownedrose:

    Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

    The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

    These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

    I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

    You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

    Behold, the behemoth!

    Meet the new (and aptly named) dinosaur species Dreadnoughtus, the most complete fossil of a massive sauropod ever unearthed, a creature so large and formidable that it was essentially invincible to the predators of its time, a dinosaur likely heavier than a 12-pack of bull elephants (and well heftier than a Boeing 737), a titan whose femur stood as high as me (and I’m no shrimp).

    Scientists aren’t ready to say that this was the largest land animal EVAR, but it’s definitely the most massive creature that we have good data for. The completeness of this skeleton is simply remarkable!  Paleontologists rarely find this many bones from the same single specimen. Some other sauropods may have in fact been more massive than Dreadnoughtus, but those bigger estimates are based on just a handful of bones. Well, not a handful, more like a truckful, but you get the idea. 

    When you’re done with the video above, head on over to National Geographic to read Brian Switek’s great summary of the news. Just imagine, if we’re still uncovering new species like this giant after centuries of sifting through the upper crust of Earth, imagine what else lies undiscovered…

    Keep digging!

    For anyone who missed it yesterday, my fellow team, museum, researchers and affiliates finally announced Dreadnoughtus to the public!

    To say we’re excited to talk about it is quite the understatement. Hope you guys enjoy reading up on this massive sauropod!

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  • crownedrose published a video post 1 week ago

    Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

    The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

    These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

    I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

    You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 1 week ago

    not-adinosaur:

    Dreadnoughtus: Gigantic, exceptionally complete sauropod dinosaur

    Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated. Its skeleton is exceptionally complete, with over 70 percent of the bones, excluding the head, represented. Because all previously discovered supermassive dinosaurs are known only from relatively fragmentary remains, Dreadnoughtus offers an unprecedented window into the anatomy and biomechanics of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth. 

    Dreadnoughtus schrani was astoundingly huge,” said Kenneth Lacovara, PhD, an associate professor in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, who discovered the Dreadnoughtus fossil skeleton in southern Patagonia in Argentina and led the excavation and analysis. “It weighed as much as a dozen African elephants or more than seven T. rex. Shockingly, skeletal evidence shows that when this 65-ton specimen died, it was not yet full grown. It is by far the best example we have of any of the most giant creatures to ever walk the planet.”[source]

    DREADNOUGHTUS.

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 1 week ago

    s-c-i-guy:

    New “Dreadnought” Dinosaur Most Complete Specimen of a Giant

    Sometime after he calculated the size of a specimens from a new supermassive dinosaur species he discovered in 2005, paleontologist Ken Lacovara nabbed one of his son’s plastic dino toys and stood on the sidewalk outside of his house in New Jersey. He held the plastic sauropod up to his eye, trying to make a mental calculation of how an actual Dreadnoughtus schrani would have looked, standing next to the house. He decided that with its head stretched out across the driveway, the tail of the 25-meter-long Dreadnoughtus would have reached well into the backyard.

    The genus name comes from the discovery team’s feeling that something this big would have, well, dread naught. “Sometimes herbivores don’t get their due as being really tough, badass animals,” Lacovara says. “At 65 tons in life, Dreadnoughtus wouldn’t be afraid of anything.” It is more than seven times as massive as a Tyrannosaurus rex. Its name is also a nod to the world’s first steel battleships, called dreadnoughts.

    The fossil, being announced today in Scientific Reports, will represent one of the largest animals ever to walk on Earth. It is also the most complete fossil of a supermassive dinosaur ever found. With further study it could yield some new insights into how these late Jurassic giants moved and grew, and how their bodies evolved their extraordinary size. “It’s an interesting discovery because of the scale and of the extent of the bones preserved,” says Kristi Curry Rogers, a paleontologist at Macalester College in Minnesota who specializes in sauropods. Dreadnoughtuses are sauropods, a long-necked, herbivorous group of dinosaurs that includes apatosaurs. Not all sauropods were giant but some of world’s biggest land animals were sauropods.

    read more

    He’s finally public! Been so excited for you guys to hear about this awesome creature.

    And yes, the name is epic.

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 4 weeks ago

    mineralists:

    Beautiful Ethiopian Fire Opal!

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 2 months ago

    generalelectric:

    At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for. Imagery by @seenewphoto.

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  • crownedrose published a photo post 2 months ago

    Largest Apatosaurus Femur Ever Discovered
    And it’s discovered by a volunteer!

    This is some absolutely great news out of the dino world today. Many museums, societies, and groups are gearing up or already out in the field. I won’t be attending with my museum this year (I’ll be staying back working on the three dinosaurs already in the lab), but next year I should be good to go for the entire summer.

    We have a lot of people come into the museum asking how they can get involved with dinosaur digs and the museum in general. There are some amazing volunteer opportunities out there to work in the museum, go out on real digs, and attend other wonderful events. This story is a perfect example of how volunteers can make amazing discoveries and help keeping the palaeontology world finding new and very important fossils each year!

    The fossils were found at the Trail Through Time quarry in Colorado.

    Here’s a few snippets from the Huffington Post article:

    "This week scientists confirmed that a huge dinosaur bone unearthed on a dig in Colorado is the largest Apatosaurus femur ever discovered — and it was found not by professional paleontologists but by a volunteer named Kay Fredette.”

    "Dorothy and I were working on some bones… and came across this lump and thought, ‘Oh my goodness, we found another vertebra,’" Fredette told local TV channel KREX, referring to the discovery she and a fellow digger made. "Well, then we got to the back side of it, and it swooped back up again."

    "The bone, which measures 6 feet 7 inches, belonged to an apatosaurus estimated to have been 80 to 90 feet long, according to Robert Gay, a paleontologist at the Dinosaur Journey Museum in Fruita, Colo."

    “‘It’s significant because it gives us an idea of the upper size these animals are able to reach,” Gay told The Huffington Post. “For a long time, we knew these were enormous animals, but most of the ones we’ve found have not been adult.’”

    "The bone may help paleontologists understand how Apatosaurus differed from closely related dinosaurs, how its body changed as it grew, and what drove it to become so large, he added.”

    Go join a museum dig, folks! You just never know what you might uncover.

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 2 months ago

    filmdot:

    The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

    Archived in: #grand budapest hotel #YES / 3,083 notes
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  • crownedrose published a text post 2 months ago

    Gonna have some new stuff coming to you guys soon! Promiseeeee!

    But right now, a Edmontosaurus and Tyrannosaurus need a little help getting out of some sandstone/limestone matrix with me and an air scribe…

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 3 months ago

    jurassiraptor:

    Jurassic World Nights

    Image by Colin Trevorrow

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  • arrowtongue asked a question 3 months ago
    arrowtongue How do you feel about Jurassic Park 4?

    Ohhhhh, a Jurassic World question!

    To be honest, I haven’t been following it too closely. From last I checked, they’re keeping the script/plot pretty secretive. I’ve seen all of the promo photos that have been released, and especially that awesome photo of the original Jeeps coming back! I’ve also seen some photos from the paparazzi and fans sneaking onto the premises or whatever; usually very blurry - but still cool.

    I’m in the very long process of building my own Jurassic Park Jeep (#18 of course!).

    I also heard some rumour (or truth?) about mutant dinosaurs? I’m not sure how I feel about that whole plot/idea just yet. I don’t want to spoil anyone, but apparently some of the content in the link above has been confirmed by Colin, so I guess we shall see as time ticks on.

    In the end, this will probably be another big budget film that will have the staff and I educating the public at the museum about what we truly do know and theorise about dinosaurs. Even in 2014, I have to show the skull of a real Velociraptor to the public so they understand Jurassic Park's raptors are not accurate. Luckily, we also have the cast of a full grown Deinonychus to show the size difference between the two dromaeosaurids.

    The pseudoscience behind the DNA splicing will attract an audience, but I sure don’t want it to end up being another Terra Nova disaster. I’ll be seeing it no matter what, because Jurassic Park is the reason I fell in love with palaeontology. And of course, artistic licensing is fine for a film or television show, but there’s also a line you want to draw because we do have so much evidence and science to back up a lot of theories now.

    Here’s the other thing I’ve found: people are always creating these mutant new dinosaurs to scare the hell out of audiences, but yet there are so many AWESOME dinos that actually existed! Why not take a real dinosaur and give it the spotlight? I want some epic blockbuster screen time for Therizinosaurus! Cryolophosaurus is a badass too. They’re just the first two that popped into my head, but a lot of real killer carnivores could be thrown onto the big screen to strut their stuff.

    Oh, and the whole thing with feathers not happening………… UGH.

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  • crownedrose reblogged a photo post 3 months ago

    crownedrose:

    Deinonychus antirrhopus (© crownedrose)

    ➛ Lived during the Cretaceous Period.
    ➛ A member of the Dromaeosauridae family.
    ➛ Most likely covered in feathers, but we have no skin/feather evidence currently for Deinonychus.
    ➛ The top of its head reached a little over halfway up an average human’s body, and generally reached lengths of 11 feet.
    ➛ As shown, it features a sickle claw on each hind foot.
    ➛ Deinonychus is a very important dinosaur because of John Ostrom’s work with the theropod, leading to the Dinosaur Renaissance.
    ➛ These photos were taken by me at The Field Museum in Chicago.

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